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William J. Jenkins

Dr. William (Bill) J. Jenkins joined the Department of Psychology at Mercer University in 2008. Originally from South Carolina, Dr. Jenkins did his graduate work at the University of Michigan and then completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Cincinnati. Education Ph.D., Biopsychology, University of Michigan M.A., Biopsychology, University of Michigan B.A., Psychology, University of South Carolina Specialty Biopsychology, behavioral neuroscience, endocrinology Professional Interests Dr. Jenkins teaches a wide variety of courses in the Department of Psychology including: Introduction to Psychology, Biopsychology, Drugs & Behavior, Hormones & Behavior, Psychology of Gender, Research Methods and Statistics, and occasional special topics courses. He has broad research interests relating to sex/gender differences in brain and behavior. He is especially interested in issues related to drug taking behavior, gender identity, and sexual orientation. Dr. Jenkins has also been involved in a number of collaborative research projects focusing on stigmatized populations and celebrity worship. Other Interests Dr. Jenkins enjoys watching college sports, reading, and spending time with his dogs in his spare time. He also enjoys cooking, baking, and shopping. Recent Publications Gillen, M., Bernstein, M., Edman, J., Leary, T., McCutcheon, L., & Jenkins, W. (2018). Schadenfreude and sport celebrity worship. Journal of Studies in Social Sciences, 17. McCutcheon, L., Aruguete, M.S., Jenkins, W., McCarley, N., and Yockey, R. (2016). An investigation of demographic correlates of the Celebrity Attitude Scale. Interpersona, 10, 161-70. McCutcheon, L.E., Aruguete, M.S., McKelvie, S.J., Jenkins, W., Williams, J.L., McCarley, N., Rivardo, M., & Shaughnessy, M.F. (2016). How questionable are predatory social science journals? North American Journal of Psychology, 18, 427-40. McCutcheon, L.E., Aruguete, M., McCarley, N.G., & Jenkins, W.J. (2016). Further validation of an indirect measure of celebrity stalking. Journal of Studies in Social Sciences, 14, 75-91. McCutcheon, L.E., Lowinger, R.L., Wong, M., & Jenkins, W. (2014). Is analytic thinking related to celebrity worship and disbelief in religion? North American Journal of Psychology, 16, 453-62. Price, J., Lowinger, R.L., Jenkins, W., & McCutcheon, L.E. (2014). The stigmatization of people with a history of mental illness by those who admire celebrities. North American Journal of Psychology, 16, 253-60. McCutcheon, L.E., Lowinger, R., Wong, M., & Jenkins, W. (2013). Celebrity worship and religion revisited. Implicit Religion, 16, 319-28. Argurete, M., Goodboy, A., Jenkins, W.J., Mansson, D.H., & McCutcheon, L. (2012). Does religious faith improve test performance? North American Journal of Psychology, 14, 185-96. Jenkins, W.J., Ruppel, S. E., Kizer, J. B., Yehl, J. & Griffin, J. L. (2012). An examination of post 9-11 attitudes towards Arab Americans. North American Journal of Psychology, 14, 77-84. Jenkins, W.J. (2010). Can anyone tell me why I’m gay? What research suggests regarding the origins of sexual orientation. North American Journal of Psychology, 12, 279-96. Ruppel, S. E., Jenkins, W.J., Griffin, J. L., & Kizer, J. B. (2010). Are they depressed or just old? A study of attitudes towards the elderly suffering from depression. North American Journal of Psychology, 12, 31-42. Gass, J. T., Jenkins, W.J., Marino, M. D., Lugo, J. L., Jr., & Kelly, S.J. (2007). Alcohol exposure during development: Analysis of effects on female sexual behavior. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 31, 2065-72. Jenkins, W.J. & Becker, J.B. (2003). Dynamic increases in dopamine during paced copulation in the female rat. European Journal of Neuroscience, 18, 1997-2001.. Jenkins, W.J. & Becker, J.B. (2003). Female rats develop conditioned place preference for sex at their preferred interval. Hormones and Behavior, 43, 503-7. Jenkins, W.J. & Becker, J.B. (2001). Role of the striatum and nucleus accumbens in paced copulatory behavior in female rats. Behavioural Brain Research, 121(1-2), 119-128. Becker, J.B., Rudick, C.N., & Jenkins, W.J. (2001). The role of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens and striatum during sexual behavior in the female rat. Journal of Neuroscience, 21, 3236-3241. Tran, T.D., Cronise, K., Marino, M.D., Jenkins, W.J., & Kelly, S.J. (2000) Critical periods for the effects of alcohol exposure on brain weight, body weight, activity, and investigation. Behavioral Brain Research, 116(1), 99-110. Contact Dr. William (Bill) J. Jenkins (478) 301-2511 jenkins_wj@mercer.eduDr. William (Bill) J. Jenkins joined the Department of Psychology at Mercer University in 2008. Originally from South Carolina, Dr. Jenkins did his graduate work at the University of Michigan and then completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Cincinnati. Education Ph.D., Biopsychology, University of Michigan M.A., Biopsychology, University of Michigan B.A., Psychology, University of South Carolina Specialty Biopsychology, behavioral neuroscience, endocrinology Professional Interests Dr. Jenkins teaches a wide variety of courses in the Department of Psychology including: Introduction to Psychology, Biopsychology, Drugs & Behavior, Hormones & Behavior, Psychology of Gender, Research Methods and Statistics, and occasional special topics courses. He has broad research interests relating to sex/gender differences in brain and behavior. He is especially interested in issues related to drug taking behavior, gender identity, and sexual orientation. Dr. Jenkins has also been involved in a number of collaborative research projects focusing on stigmatized populations and celebrity worship. Other Interests Dr. Jenkins enjoys watching college sports, reading, and spending time with his dogs in his spare time. He also enjoys cooking, baking, and shopping. Recent Publications Gillen, M., Bernstein, M., Edman, J., Leary, T., McCutcheon, L., & Jenkins, W. (2018). Schadenfreude and sport celebrity worship. Journal of Studies in Social Sciences, 17. McCutcheon, L., Aruguete, M.S., Jenkins, W., McCarley, N., and Yockey, R. (2016). An investigation of demographic correlates of the Celebrity Attitude Scale. Interpersona, 10, 161-70. McCutcheon, L.E., Aruguete, M.S., McKelvie, S.J., Jenkins, W., Williams, J.L., McCarley, N., Rivardo, M., & Shaughnessy, M.F. (2016). How questionable are predatory social science journals? North American Journal of Psychology, 18, 427-40. McCutcheon, L.E., Aruguete, M., McCarley, N.G., & Jenkins, W.J. (2016). Further validation of an indirect measure of celebrity stalking. Journal of Studies in Social Sciences, 14, 75-91. McCutcheon, L.E., Lowinger, R.L., Wong, M., & Jenkins, W. (2014). Is analytic thinking related to celebrity worship and disbelief in religion? North American Journal of Psychology, 16, 453-62. Price, J., Lowinger, R.L., Jenkins, W., & McCutcheon, L.E. (2014). The stigmatization of people with a history of mental illness by those who admire celebrities. North American Journal of Psychology, 16, 253-60. McCutcheon, L.E., Lowinger, R., Wong, M., & Jenkins, W. (2013). Celebrity worship and religion revisited. Implicit Religion, 16, 319-28. Argurete, M., Goodboy, A., Jenkins, W.J., Mansson, D.H., & McCutcheon, L. (2012). Does religious faith improve test performance? North American Journal of Psychology, 14, 185-96. Jenkins, W.J., Ruppel, S. E., Kizer, J. B., Yehl, J. & Griffin, J. L. (2012). An examination of post 9-11 attitudes towards Arab Americans. North American Journal of Psychology, 14, 77-84. Jenkins, W.J. (2010). Can anyone tell me why I’m gay? What research suggests regarding the origins of sexual orientation. North American Journal of Psychology, 12, 279-96. Ruppel, S. E., Jenkins, W.J., Griffin, J. L., & Kizer, J. B. (2010). Are they depressed or just old? A study of attitudes towards the elderly suffering from depression. North American Journal of Psychology, 12, 31-42. Gass, J. T., Jenkins, W.J., Marino, M. D., Lugo, J. L., Jr., & Kelly, S.J. (2007). Alcohol exposure during development: Analysis of effects on female sexual behavior. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 31, 2065-72. Jenkins, W.J. & Becker, J.B. (2003). Dynamic increases in dopamine during paced copulation in the female rat. European Journal of Neuroscience, 18, 1997-2001.. Jenkins, W.J. & Becker, J.B. (2003). Female rats develop conditioned place preference for sex at their preferred interval. Hormones and Behavior, 43, 503-7. Jenkins, W.J. & Becker, J.B. (2001). Role of the striatum and nucleus accumbens in paced copulatory behavior in female rats. Behavioural Brain Research, 121(1-2), 119-128. Becker, J.B., Rudick, C.N., & Jenkins, W.J. (2001). The role of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens and striatum during sexual behavior in the female rat. Journal of Neuroscience, 21, 3236-3241. Tran, T.D., Cronise, K., Marino, M.D., Jenkins, W.J., & Kelly, S.J. (2000) Critical periods for the effects of alcohol exposure on brain weight, body weight, activity, and investigation. Behavioral Brain Research, 116(1), 99-110. Contact Dr. William (Bill) J. Jenkins (478) 301-2511 jenkins_wj@mercer.edu

William J. Jenkins

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About William J. Jenkins

Dr. William (Bill) J. Jenkins joined the Department of Psychology at Mercer University in 2008. Originally from South Carolina, Dr. Jenkins did his graduate work at the University of Michigan and then completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Cincinnati. Education Ph.D., Biopsychology, University of Michigan M.A., Biopsychology, University of Michigan B.A., Psychology, University of South Carolina Specialty Biopsychology, behavioral neuroscience, endocrinology Professional Interests Dr. Jenkins teaches a wide variety of courses in the Department of Psychology including: Introduction to Psychology, Biopsychology, Drugs & Behavior, Hormones & Behavior, Psychology of Gender, Research Methods and Statistics, and occasional special topics courses. He has broad research interests relating to sex/gender differences in brain and behavior. He is especially interested in issues related to drug taking behavior, gender identity, and sexual orientation. Dr. Jenkins has also been involved in a number of collaborative research projects focusing on stigmatized populations and celebrity worship. Other Interests Dr. Jenkins enjoys watching college sports, reading, and spending time with his dogs in his spare time. He also enjoys cooking, baking, and shopping. Recent Publications Gillen, M., Bernstein, M., Edman, J., Leary, T., McCutcheon, L., & Jenkins, W. (2018). Schadenfreude and sport celebrity worship. Journal of Studies in Social Sciences, 17. McCutcheon, L., Aruguete, M.S., Jenkins, W., McCarley, N., and Yockey, R. (2016). An investigation of demographic correlates of the Celebrity Attitude Scale. Interpersona, 10, 161-70. McCutcheon, L.E., Aruguete, M.S., McKelvie, S.J., Jenkins, W., Williams, J.L., McCarley, N., Rivardo, M., & Shaughnessy, M.F. (2016). How questionable are predatory social science journals? North American Journal of Psychology, 18, 427-40. McCutcheon, L.E., Aruguete, M., McCarley, N.G., & Jenkins, W.J. (2016). Further validation of an indirect measure of celebrity stalking. Journal of Studies in Social Sciences, 14, 75-91. McCutcheon, L.E., Lowinger, R.L., Wong, M., & Jenkins, W. (2014). Is analytic thinking related to celebrity worship and disbelief in religion? North American Journal of Psychology, 16, 453-62. Price, J., Lowinger, R.L., Jenkins, W., & McCutcheon, L.E. (2014). The stigmatization of people with a history of mental illness by those who admire celebrities. North American Journal of Psychology, 16, 253-60. McCutcheon, L.E., Lowinger, R., Wong, M., & Jenkins, W. (2013). Celebrity worship and religion revisited. Implicit Religion, 16, 319-28. Argurete, M., Goodboy, A., Jenkins, W.J., Mansson, D.H., & McCutcheon, L. (2012). Does religious faith improve test performance? North American Journal of Psychology, 14, 185-96. Jenkins, W.J., Ruppel, S. E., Kizer, J. B., Yehl, J. & Griffin, J. L. (2012). An examination of post 9-11 attitudes towards Arab Americans. North American Journal of Psychology, 14, 77-84. Jenkins, W.J. (2010). Can anyone tell me why I’m gay? What research suggests regarding the origins of sexual orientation. North American Journal of Psychology, 12, 279-96. Ruppel, S. E., Jenkins, W.J., Griffin, J. L., & Kizer, J. B. (2010). Are they depressed or just old? A study of attitudes towards the elderly suffering from depression. North American Journal of Psychology, 12, 31-42. Gass, J. T., Jenkins, W.J., Marino, M. D., Lugo, J. L., Jr., & Kelly, S.J. (2007). Alcohol exposure during development: Analysis of effects on female sexual behavior. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 31, 2065-72. Jenkins, W.J. & Becker, J.B. (2003). Dynamic increases in dopamine during paced copulation in the female rat. European Journal of Neuroscience, 18, 1997-2001.. Jenkins, W.J. & Becker, J.B. (2003). Female rats develop conditioned place preference for sex at their preferred interval. Hormones and Behavior, 43, 503-7. Jenkins, W.J. & Becker, J.B. (2001). Role of the striatum and nucleus accumbens in paced copulatory behavior in female rats. Behavioural Brain Research, 121(1-2), 119-128. Becker, J.B., Rudick, C.N., & Jenkins, W.J. (2001). The role of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens and striatum during sexual behavior in the female rat. Journal of Neuroscience, 21, 3236-3241. Tran, T.D., Cronise, K., Marino, M.D., Jenkins, W.J., & Kelly, S.J. (2000) Critical periods for the effects of alcohol exposure on brain weight, body weight, activity, and investigation. Behavioral Brain Research, 116(1), 99-110. Contact Dr. William (Bill) J. Jenkins (478) 301-2511 jenkins_wj@mercer.edu

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